Monday, April 23, 2018

the Vatican’s Swiss Guard is looking for a few good men


No gossips need apply!


The Vatican’s Swiss Guard wants you!


"The worst bomb inside the Vatican is gossip," which "threatens the life of the church and the life of (the Vatican) every day," he said, because it "sows destruction" and "destroys the lives of others."

While there are many religious and laypeople in the Vatican who are "sowing good seed," the devil is still getting his way by using others "to sow weeds."

Even the pope is not immune to this temptation, he said; it's a danger "for me, too," because "the devil gives you that yearning."

So in addition to looking for the usual security threats, the pope told the security guards to also crack down on backstabbing and courageously call people out.

Stop them in their tracks and say, "Please sir, please ma'am, please father, please sister, please your Excellency, please your Eminence, please Holy Father, don't gossip; that's not allowed here," the pope said.

Pope launches alarm, tells Vatican security force to be 'gossip police', Catholic News Service, (30 September 2014).


Looking for a few good mercenaries



Related:




What are you waiting for?


Contact the Swiss Guard and let them know you want to combat gossip!



Thursday, April 12, 2018

Pixels


A pixel, web beacon, web bug, tracking bug, tag, page tag, tracking pixel, pixel tag, 1×1 gif, ofd clear gif is an important part of the internet which is abused by companies such as facebook and google.  Most users of the internet are as unaware of how it functions, as they are of how an elevator operates.  As long as they can push a few buttons and get the outcome they want, they never think of what is happening underneath the surface.  The last time we at Call Me Jorge... sat down and calculated how much a facebook account should cost per year it was in the ballpark of around $700.  In other words would you want to pay $700 for using facebook a year?  So how does facebook remain free?  Simply by building up files on anyone (via the pixel), even if they do not have a facebook account, who uses the internet and selling that data.  There is no such thing as a free lunch.  You are the end product living in a panopticon.

Francis has met with several high tech heads (including Mark Zuckerberg) at the Vatican and formed partnerships with them.  All that was made publicly available about Francis’ meeting with Mr. Zuckerberg is that Mark wants to bring the internet to the ‘peripheries’ in the name of the ‘greater good’ and Francis shares this goal.  Zuckerberg and Facebook have lobbied through his sister, Randi Zuckerberg, for the abolition of anonymity on the Internet in the name of saving children because of the plague of cyber-bullying that’s run amok the world over.  You can’t make this garbage up.

Below are three videos from Zuckerberg’s congressional questioning, photos from Zuckerberg’s social media and the internet which show Zuckerberg’s practice of Talmudic Judaism as well as his connection to the Chabad-Lubavitcher master race cult.

For readers who don’t understand pixels or the tracking technology used by Facebook and other internet companies we highly recommend reading two pieces by Karl Denninger:

We have copy-and-pasted the posts below for posterity’s sake but would rather have you read them at Mr. Denninger’s website, Market Ticker, and support his blog by doing so.


Zuckerberg practices the rhetoric tricks of Talmudic pilpul to evade answering the questions asked.



‘your data’ doesn’t include facebook’s file on you



the CEO either doesn’t know what’s going on at his company or ?



(click images to enlarge)


Tell us how you feel Mark

An instant messenger exchange (from early 2004) Zuckerberg had with a college friend shortly after launching The Facebook in his dorm room. — Well, These New Zuckerberg IMs Won't Help Facebook's Privacy Problems, Business Insider, Nicholas Carlson (13 May 2010)


Celebrating Purim, did Zuckerberg get 
drunk as commanded by the Talmud?

 Mark Zuckerberg in 2004 celebrating Purim at Harvard Chabad with Rabbi Hirschy Zarchi and his brother Mayer Zarchi. (more photos)


Wearing a kippah is an outward denial 
of Jesus the Christ as one’s Savior.

Mark wearing a kippah at his sister’s (Randi Jayne) wedding to Brent Tworetzky. (2008)


Meeting the Haredi movers & shakers of the world

Mark Zuckerberg with the late, Szymon Perski (aka Shimon Peres).

Zuckerberg with Benjamin Netanyahu, the father of ‘the war on terror’.


Chabad connection shows up again.

Rabbi Hirschy Zarchi of Chabad congratulates Mark Zuckerberg for receiving a honorary degree from Harvard University (26 May 2017).  (source)


Inculcating the next generation with Talmudism

Will Zuckerberg’s daughter ask her god to “Pour Out Thy Wrath” on the goyim?

“For shabbat tonight, we gave Max a kiddush cup that has been in our family for almost 100 years. Her great-great-grandfather Max got it after our family immigrated here and it has been passed down through our family ever since.” — Facebook, (15 September 2017) 



Did Zukerberg also swing a chicken 
around his head for Yom Kippur?

Facebook, (30 September 2017) 


Making Haman’s ears cookies (Haman lives throughout history as Esau, Amalek, Haman and his descendants Rome, Christendom, Gentiles, etc...)

“Baking hamentashen. Chag sameach! — celebrating Purim with Priscilla Chan.” — Facebook, (2 March 2018) 


The usual nonsense from the various social media companies has started up once anew.

It's very important you understand how they steal data on you, the scope of that theft, and why it matters along with why you not only didn't consent you can't consent.

To understand this you must understand how the web works.

Let's say you go to https://market-ticker.org and read some pages there.  That's this blog, by the way. 
If you're new around here you will see a highlighted bar telling you that signing in will improve your experience.  This is because if you create a (free) account and sign in you can customize how the system displays things (the control panel's options are quite-extensive), you can ask it to notify you if topics you're interested in get new user comments and more.

If you sign in you would assume (and the TOS tells you) that the system will store a "cookie", which is just a numeric identifier, on your machine.  That's how it knows who you are when you click a new page, or when you come back to the page later.

But this is not limited to when you sign in.  Any site on the web can and most do send down other cookies.  This software, for example, sends done what is known as a "UUID", or "unique user ID".  It's simply a random, unique (and very long) numeric code that identifies your machine.  Why?  Because it's useful for the software to be able to do things like enforce rate-limiting (that is, to prevent spam-bots from overloading the system and doing other nasty things they would try to do), specifically.  It also allows the software to correlate accesses whether you're signed in or not, which helps security (e.g. if you lose your password the system has a decent idea if you really are who you're trying to get a validation email for!)

Why is this important?  Because any access to a page on the site for which the cookie is valid will have the cookie sent with the request, no matter what page you are accessing on the Internet, and in addition the exact URL you visited is also sent that generated the request.

What's important to understand is that the site you're reading does not generate that request -- your browser does.  Your browser gets a line that says "<script .....>", "<img ....>" or similar and it sends a request for that resource to the specified place.  In the request is the source page (where the request came from) and any cookies your browser has that are valid for the address to which the request is sent.

So let's assume you're Facesucker.  You make it "easy" for site owners to put "likes" and even use sign-on features from Facebook's authentication on your page.  Say, you're a newspaper
Ok, so I go to www.mylocalnews.dirtbag/my-local-jackass-city-council.html.

As the page loads it requests the "like" buttons from Facebook for the articles, and in addition requests the sign-in box for comments.  Both of those generate a request to Facebook's computers and in that request is the exact URL I am reading -- that is, from where the request came.

Now here's the important part: If I have signed into Facebook at any time in the past from that device then the company has stored one or more cookies on my machine that uniquely identify me.  Since the request to Facebook's servers match the place where the cookie came from they now get the exact article I was reading and my identity even though I did not sign into Facebook to read the article.  I have given no consent to this, I cannot opt out of it and every single place on the Internet that has these buttons and/or sign-on boxes causes this to happen.

What's even worse is that I don't have to actually have signed into Facebook, ever, or even have an account in order for this to occur.  The first time that request goes to Facebook if there are no cookies sent Facebook can assign me one and check my browser's characteristics, including the IP address I'm coming from.  I now am "branded", in that the same cookie will be used to track me forever, and if I at any time in the future sign into Facebook or otherwise use any of their facilities I will then retroactively associate all of that browsing data with my person.

Now you know why Facebook allows (for "free") the user of the OAUTH sign-on facility and promotes "like" buttons all over the web.  It is not about increasing your social experience. 
It is about snooping on everything you do online so they can sell and use that data without your knowledge or consent and in fact it is impossible for you to give prior consent because you have no idea the buttons are there before you visit the page!

You can defend against this by clearing all your cookies every time you use your computer, which will cause new cookies to be generated for each visit, but few if any people will.  Never mind that on a phone this happens too and there they can often determine at least coarse location without even having a "location" permission turned on (simply by what network and IP you're on.)  Note that many so-called "apps" are really not much more than a "front" for web accesses to special URLs that know how to parse what comes back and thus obey the exact same conventions regarding cookies.

could do this sort of thing here on the Ticker as my web servers get the same data theirs do on every request but I don't -- on purpose -- because I consider it an outrageous invasion of your privacy and rights.  A few years ago I removed the "Like" and similar buttons for Facebook from the Ticker for this very reason, after a fairly-careful study convinced me they were indeed abusing that data in exactly that fashion.  For right now Twitter's are still present but can be opted out of if you create a login here via the control panel options (that is, if you are signed in you can disable the script loads and thus Twitter's ability to "see" that you read the page.)

This sort of "data mining" needs to be prohibited as a matter of criminal law. Fines will do nothing as they are simply a cost of doing business.  Instead, any firm that does this since consent is impossible must have their corporate charter revoked and their entire board tossed in prison for gross and outrageous invasions of privacy and personal rights.

But -- doing that would shrink Facebook's data stream to a tiny fraction of what it is now and basically all of its market cap exists only because it can and does personally profile anyone that touches any resource that uses its "like" or sign-on functions and sells that.

This "business model" is nothing other than an outrageous invasion of privacy, it occurs without your consent, you'd never consent to it if you did understand it fully and exactly how-accurately they can measure everything about you and you get directly screwed by various firms as a result to the tune of hundreds or thousands of dollars a year.

My reason to believe the latter?  Their ARPU could not possibly exist unless you're getting hosed for at least 10x that amount, since most "advertising" does not in fact drive behavior and is worth zero.  The small percentage that actually results in a conversion (sale) thus must support the entire ARPU generated or their business instantly collapses.


The REAL Social Media SCAM, Market Ticker, Karl Denninger, (20 March 2018)


Folks, cut the crap ok? 
I know what you're thinking -- I'll just turn off "third party cookies" and all will be ok (in relation to my previous article.) 
Incidentally, that is not the default for Chrome and other browsers.  Gee, I wonder why?  Who runs all sorts of third-party ad networks again? 
But that aside this doesn't work. 
The reason is an HTTP field called an "Etag." 
Etags, along with expiration dates and "If-Modified-Since" allow a browser to quickly check with a host whether or not content has changed, without re-downloading it.  Let's say you get an image on the web.  Later, you go back to the same page and the same image is there, since it has not changed.  If the image is still in your cache it is very wasteful to send the whole thing again -- which could be several megabytes.  Instead, if it hasn't changed, you can just display what's in the cache. 
Well, to know that, you need to know if the resource changed on the server end.  There are two ways to do this -- using a date stamp, and using what's called an "Etag." 
The latter can be attached to any resource, although it's usually attached to images.  The server sends down an Etag: field with the image in the HTTP headers, which is an opaque identifier.  In other words, from the browser's point of view it does not care what the string is; it doesn't represent a time, date, or anything other than a promise from the server that it shall change if the content has changed and needs to be re-sent. 
If this sounds like a cookie that's because it can be abused to become one, and you cannot shut it off unlike cookies! 
So let's say you disable third-party cookies.  Fine, you think.  Nope. 
I have a "Like" button.  Said button has an image.  That image is the finger pointing up, of course, and you must transfer it at least once.  I send an Etag with it, but instead of it being a change index it's unique to you! 
Now, every single time you request the button you send the Etag for the image.  If it hasn't changed (and it basically never will, right -- it's an upturned finger!) I send back "Not modified".  Except.... I just pinned to you, personally, that access to the page and you have third-party cookies turned  off! 
So I send back "Not modified" but you just told me who you are, what web page you were viewing, and your browser ID and IP address. 
I get all of this for every page you visit where such a button or function is present even if you never use it. 
Surprise! 
Oh by the way this works with beacons of course, since they're 1-pixel transparent images.  And no, I wasn't the first to figure this one out many years ago, and it's been known and in active use on the web for a long time. 
The premise that blocking third-party cookies prevents these folks from being able to figure out who you are and what arbitrary web content you are viewing is false!  Nice switch Mr. Browser writer, too bad it doesn't solve the problem! 
What this means is that you can be tracked specifically and individually, as you personally, with knowledge of who you are, where you are, when you clicked it and exactly what page you looked atwhenever you visit a page that has any such thing on it without your knowledge or consent should any such resource be included in that page.  It is inherently part of the web server's logs that the owner of the page you visit gets your browser ID, IP address and what you viewed.  But what you probably didn't know and certainly did not consent to is that through very trivial abuse any resource that comes from some other web property -- a like button, a sign-in option for other than a locally-stored account, even an ad can cause your system to obtain, store and regurgitate a unique identifier specific to you and your device whenever that resource is encountered, anywhere.  As soon as you do anything that links that identifier to you as a human that relationship is then known and never lost.  Indeed it can happen retroactively in that the tag can be generated one day and then days, weeks, months or even years later you might provide the missing component (your identity) on some other page that contains the same resource. 
There is no way for you to consent because it happens before you can possibly know it will and thus you can't give consent.  You also can't know in advance where else that "capturing" system for your presence might be operating. It works exactly like a third-party cookie except that you cannot shut it off other than by operating system (or firewall) blocking of the entire domain or IP address involved or by clearing all cached data on every access, which is extraordinarily wasteful.  If you're on an Android phone or an iPhone, since both prohibit editing the /etc/hosts file that would otherwise make blocking such possible without too much trouble (e.g. through "Adblock") you cannot reasonably interdict this at all on the stock browsers. 
You also cannot block this on desktop or tablet browsers without severely damaging your browsing experience.  Specifically, while you could conceivably load an extension to block all Etag headers doing so would probably get you blackballed on many sites (it sure would here and probably automatically as the system would consider it abuse!) because doing that would result in your data transfer requirements from the site skyrocketing as every single image would have to be sent on every access even if you already had an unaltered copy in your local system's cache in memory or on disk. 
Facebook's entire business model relies on this.  That is why they "offer" their sign-on system to newspapers, blogs and other web sites all over the world.  It is also why they have their "like" buttons everywhere.  It is through those "features" that they track everything you do online, even if you don't have an account with them, and all of that tracking processing and sale of whatever they learn of your personal life is done without any consent because it is not possible to consent to what you're not aware of in advance
This is why the only solution to Facebook's data mining, and they're not alone in this (and yes, it has to apply to all of these firms and those yet to come), is legislative.  This sort of activity -- collecting anything from those places where "like" buttons or any other third-party content is placed, or where sign-on credentials are used, and where that data is either used to inform decisions (e.g. advertising) or sold must be considered a felony criminal offense punished with the revocation of corporate charters and indictment of every officer and director of the firm involved. 
could trivially commit this sort of abuse, by the way, on The Ticker.  It would require a hell of a lot of storage, but it would be easy to do.  
I don't do it because it's wrong. 
Others don't give a crap if it's wrong. 
Zucker****er is one of the worst.  His latest missive is especially damning, in that it deliberately omits the fact that Obama's 2012 campaign used such data mining.  He didn't object then because they wanted the Democrats to win.  Note that he takes no credit for that, nor does he accept blame.  He simply lies by omission. 
No, you can't fix this by not having a social media account personally since you don't have to sign in for you to be tracked and the tracking not only happens on the site in question it happens anywhere connections to that site are found such as images, buttons or other related functionality. 
For this reason the problem can only be fixed legislatively or if all of said firms are driven out of business due to mass-revulsion by the people -- either way the only fix is if pulling this crap is an instant corporate death sentence right here, right now.  

The OTHER Half Of The Social Scam (MUST READ), Market Ticker, Karl Denninger, (23 March 2018)

Something to ponder...

This entry was posted over at the Thinking Housewife blog last week.  It gives one something to think about when compared to the dross that comes out of the idiot box.  The occult is known for mocking its victims and how more of a macabre jest can one create than pinning crimes on an enemy, that you committed, while letting those in the know you are hoodwinking everyone?
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She Hava De Gun

April 6, 2018


NASIM AGHDAM, the woman allegedly involved in what appeared to be a comically staged shooting at Youtube headquarters, does squats joyfully and energetically before her national flag, and to the tune of “Hava Nagila,” in this video. Miss Aghdam is probably on an island beach somewhere right now resting up from her “suicide.”
“Hava de guns, Hava de guns, Hava de guns and we be happy.”
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source: Thinking Housewife, She Hava De Gun